Making Money Online Uncategorized

“Word whore” or cog?

I’m trying to come to peace with the term “content mill.” It always sounds so negative. Mainly, I don’t care. The people who insult Demand Studios writers often don’t tell the whole story. They talk about the “pathetic pay” which, in my experience, is $40-$80 an hour. What’s so pathetic about that, considering I have no commute time, I invent my own hours and schedule and I don’t even have to get dressed?

As a long-time advocate of self-employment, the idea of being a factory cog has always been unattractive to me, and that’s what the term “content mill” implies. However, I see other writers embracing it, which is probably a better idea. Maryann from OnText actually uses it in the title of her “how to write online and make money” eBook, called “Writing for Content Mills.”

So am I the only one who has an aversion to the negative connotation behind the term “content mill?” Is it just me?

I can dissect the phrase. Mills grind wheat into flour. So we must be the wheat, right? Or perhaps we’re the farmer that delivers the wheat. There’s no shame in that, right? Maybe we ARE the wheat? Not that that’s a bad thing. I hate analogies. The simple fact is, words are free. But I sell them. And it pays the bills. So why does it matter what it’s called? If anything, perhaps an ugly name will scare away other applicants.

Perhaps we can call them “Article Pimps” which would, of course make us all word whores. Maybe that’s not such a good idea. Although I do most of my work lying in bed with my laptop.

One thing is for sure, I know I’m making more than a fiction bookwriter. Author Jamie Lee Hansen breaks it down in her blog. For a $7 book, the government gets 57 cents and the author gets 56 cents. Wow.

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